Tag Archives: winter harvest

Harpoon pt. 1…

12 Dec

Well, there’s the rivalry—Yankees vs. Red Sox, Giants vs. Pats, Bruins vs. Rangers, Celtics vs. Knicks (and add the ‘Nets to that now), but we’re talking about sports, not beer here.  And when it comes to Harpoon, well, maybe we can try to compete a local New York brewery against them, but why would you want to?

NYC already embraces Harpoon:  We see their flagship IPA at a number of local bars with its signature orange tap, and I can’t help but want to be whisked away to Boston’s “hah-bah,” drinking their beers on a sail boat, possibly whale watching…

But there’s much more to Harpoon than just their IPA.  I’m sure you’ve seen their UFO’s (UnFiltered Offering for all of you neophytes) and most likely their seasonals.  You may have even been privileged enough to pick up a recent 100 Barrel Series at your local great craft beer store.  But if you’ve never been to Boston and visited their brewery, well you don’t know beans (apparently beans are a big thing up there).

Two Girls One Pint (along with StevieAnn from Sassy Beer) were fortunate to venture up there last Monday and experience it for ourselves—this place is the real deal, with great, drinkable beer.  They should know good beer—they have been around since 1986.  And Harpoon doesn’t need fancy commercials to get its point across…the beer speaks for itself.

The brewery was the first company to obtain a permit to manufacture and sell alcohol in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in over 25 years.  This is thanks to their founders, fondly referred to as “Rich & Dan,” who attended Harvard and after traveling Europe, were inspired enough to start their own brewery.   For us, it’s hard to believe that Harpoon is “that old” (ok so 26 is not old by any means but in the craft beer world, it’s ancient).

Upon visiting the brewery, one is greeted with a metal gate displaying the four essential ingredients: Water, grains, hops, and yeast.  The tasting room is warm and friendly—samples are offered two times a day (at 2 pm and 4 pm) and full brewery tours are offered on the weekend.  We were surprised not only by the warm greetings from our tasting room hostesses, but also but the diverse offerings.

Aside from their signature IPA complete with its orange tap handle, also available were the UFO (and its raspberry version), 3 current Leviathan offerings (more on them later), some experimental beers from their 400 gallon series (basically a home-brewer’s wet dream), their current seasonals (Winter Warmer and Chocolate Stout), their newest 100 Barrel Series brew (El Triunfo Coffee Porter), their amazing cider, their Dark (formally called Munich dark) and their new all-round Rye IPA.  The selection is overwhelming, especially on a Monday afternoon.

Without leaving the room, guests are lucky enough to be poured samples of any beer they desire (it’s really hard to choose one) then given a story behind the beers and the brewery between swallows.  Twenty-first birthdays are celebrated, old friends reunited while new friends are made.  The tasting room becomes a meeting place for a bunch of strangers with one thing in common: Their love of great beer.

If you haven’t tried it yet, the not-even-one-year-old Rye IPA is a highly enjoyable beer for those of us who lean toward an everyday IPA (not overly bitter or hoppy).  The citrus notes from the hops are balanced by the spiciness of the rye.  I’ve been drinking this baby all week like it’s my life support!

The Chocolate Stout is solid (I’m ashamed to say this was my first introduction to it).  Now that I’ve had it, I’m not quite sure how I went without for so long—it’s dark and roasty but sweet enough without being too dessert-y.  Chocolate milk for grown-ups!  And what girl (or boy) doesn’t love chocolate?  It’s also perfect for this time of year (it is a seasonal, after all).

For those of you who’ve never enjoyed a Harpoon Cider, you’re in for a real treat.  It’s extremely natural tasting (from an apple orchard 40 miles away) and employs their signature yeast so it doesn’t just taste like you’re drinking a sparkling apple juice.

Try it mixed with a Winter Warmer.  While I normally don’t advise mixing beer, we can make an exception with this, a concoction called “Apple Pie.”  The sweetness of the cider paired with the spices of their winter seasonal creates a perfect treat for a cold day.

Their Leviathan series are the high ABV ones (Imperials).  All of them are great but strong—approach with caution!  On tap currently in their tasting room was their Imperial IPA (sooo good), a Russian Imperial Stout (one to take home and age), and a Baltic Porter.

Their Dark (formally called Munich Dark, but the name seemed to intimidate people) is a perfect example of the kind of beer I am really into drinking right now—A Dunkel, the dark color is a ruse to the light-bodied, velvety textured beer disguised behind its cloudy brown (mahogany, for you fans of wood) color.  This seems to be the favorite in the Harpoon world, amongst staff and fans alike.

So what other beers did we try?  And what was it like being taken on a one-of-a-kind brewery tour by Harpoon’s Chief of Brewing Operations, Al Marzi?  What does Harpoon have in store for 2013?  For answers to all of those questions, stop by later this week for the Second Part of our series on Boston’s Harpoon Brewery!

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The most memorable of forgotten weekends!…

6 Dec

With a focus on Sandy, this past Saturday’s NYC Craft Beer Festival: Winter Harvest was fun-filled and festive—a great way to start off the holiday (beer) season.

While I was able to sneak out and sample a few great brews, I spent most of my time hanging out at our Two Girls One Pint table, chatting with folks that love beer just as much as we do.  As one passerby noted: “Aren’t you guys just a bunch of female beer geeks?”  Well, yes sir, thanks for noticing.

I was impressed by the depth and quality of beers represented—I actually didn’t expect it to be that big! (Shameless “That’s what she said” line follows here).  Upstairs in the Connoisseur lounge, those lucky enough to have access were treated to such fine brews as Goose Island’s Bourbon County Stout, always a treat for the tongue, and Dogfish Head’s Theobrama as well as comfy couches where they noshed on cheese from Murray’s and listened to talented singer/songwriter Willy Gantrim.

Downstairs in the common tasting area, local breweries like Brooklyn, Sixpoint, and ACBC (Alphabet City Brewing Company) with their “Easy Blonde” poured recognizable brews next to West Coast Lagunitas and Speakeasy.

One standout was Pennsylvania Brewing Company’s (out of Pittsburgh, PA) Nut Roll Ale, a sweet, festive winter-spiced beer that is perfect for the season.  The Founder’s Breakfast Stout seemed to be a festival favorite.  Another was the “Wookey Jack,” from Firestone Walker Brewing Co., always a producer of solid beers, many of which seem to be popping up a lot more often in our area.

I personally enjoyed sipping on Lagunitas’ Cappuccino Stout—I felt like I was drinking some delicious coffee to keep me going in the long hours spent behind the table at both sessions…but then I reminded myself that the buzz I was getting was from beer!

Unfortunately I was unable to attend any of the seminars, as us girls had work to do!  But I’d love to hear from those who did how they were.  You really can’t go wrong with eating cheese from Murray’s or learning food and beer pairing secrets from beer sommelier Hayley Jensen and Chef Stephen Durley.

The location was great and easily accessible from lower Manhattan and Brooklyn, albeit a bit tricky to navigate with a buzz on.  No matter how many “Watch Your Step” signs and yellow Caution tape outlined the path ways, I still managed to trip more than once.  I blame Sandy for this one.

But as far as music goes, my personal favorite was the selection of Frank Sinatra’s “New York, New York,” telling people their session was over and it was time to get the F out, inspiring some pretty sloppy kick-lines that The Rockettes would surely shake their head’s at.

So Sandy may have delayed the fun, but the festival was able to happen anyway, and I think this event reflected the adaptation and perseverance that so many strong-willed New Yorkers have displayed following this devastating storm.  The residents of Breezy Point who have been suffering this past month from Sandy’s effects will have a little bit of a happier holiday thanks to the generosity of festival attendees.

So, “Start Spreading the News,” the NYC Craft Beer Festival was a great time and I can only look forward to their spring event.  Look for our newscast, coming soon to Two Girls One Pint.

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This weekend you don’t want to miss this! The Winter Harvest in NYC

28 Nov

It’s hard to believe that it’s been a month now since Sandy barraged our city with her high winds and flooding, causing massive damage to several New York City neighborhoods, taking down people’s houses and closing businesses, and bringing our city to a standstill. 

            While most things seem to be getting back to “normal,” there are millions of people who have been affected by the storm and continue to suffer from her devastation. 

            That is why the rescheduled NYC Craft Beer Festival: Winter Harvest, originally to be held on November 10th, but postponed to this Saturday, December 1st, has a new emphasis placed on Sandy Relief.  Hand Crafted Tasting Co., the production company hosting the beer festival is asking people to bring things like batteries, flashlights, work gloves, tools, cleaning supplies, and even holiday gifts, which will then be donated to those who need it most in Breezy Point, Queens—just one of the many NYC neighborhoods hurt by the storm.   

            Additionally, the location of the event has changed as well.  This Saturday’s event is being held at Basketball City, which is at 299 South Street in lower Manhattan, easily accessible via the F train.       

            There will be two sessions on Saturday: The first is from 12:30-4:00 PM and the second is from 6:00-9:30 PM for the VIP/Connoisseur tickets and 1:30-4:00 PM and 7:00-9:30PM for General Admission ticket-holders. The Connoisseur tickets include access to a special designated lounge with rare beers and hors d’oeuvres that will not be available in the General Admission area.  Those tickets are $125, but go up to $135 if you wait until the day of to purchase them.
            VIP ticket holders get an extra hour of sampling for the $75 ticket price ($85 for the day of).  While General Admission tickets will cost you $55 (or $65 if you wait until Saturday).

            All ticket holders will have the option of attending three seminars including one hosted by Chris Gallant, General Manager and Co-Founder of The Bronx Brewery, about starting your own small business. 

There will also be a seminar on pairing food and beer for your holiday parties, hosted by Chef Stephen Durley and Beer Sommelier Hayley Jensen, and a cheese-and-beer-pairing seminar hosted by Aaron Foster of Murray’s Cheeses. 

            And of course, there’s the beer!  There will be approximately 150 Craft Beers from 75 breweries.  If you’ve been to a beer festival before, you know how this works: You get your 4 oz. tasting glass and try as many beers as you can within the time constraints!  Think of it as a beer-drinker’s marathon…   

            I’d recommend trying beers you’ve never had before or visiting a brewery you are unfamiliar with.  Brooklyn Brewery will have their newest Brewmaster’s Reserve, “There Will Be Black,” on tap.  This Winter seasonal (an American black ale) is made with a blend of German and American dark malts and hopped with New Zealand Pacific Gems and Motuekas and well as American Willamette hops.  I haven’t had it yet, but I’m really looking forward to trying this one on Saturday!

            You can compare Blue Point’s White IPA to the same style from Saranac.  Which one do you like better?  And why?  Or you can try Winter seasonals from your favorite breweries like Captain Lawrence and Abita.  There will surely be a style and type of beer for everyone at this Saturday’s festival. 

            And Connoisseurs will have access to specialty beers like Allagash’s Hugh Malone, a Belgian style IPA, Magic Hat’s Graupel, a wheat wine from their small batch “Humdinger” series, and even the ever-popular Goose Island Bourbon County Stout—a favorite this time of year.  If you were considering splurging on a Connoisseur ticket, these beers are just a few reasons why you should!     

            And last but not least, Two Girls One Pint will be all over this Fest!  Jennifer Wood and I will be hanging out at our table, modeling our T-shirts and talking about craft beer, while our own Josh Schwartz, Szoke Schaeffer, and Stevie Ann Nance (from the Sassy Beer Sisters) will be covering the event. 

            We’ve been waiting months for this beer festival and even Sandy couldn’t stop it.  If you are coming on Saturday, please don’t forget to bring an item to donate and stop by our table.  We can’t wait to see you there!